December 13, 2010
monkeytonenews:

generic1:

Squid pro quo:

Final section: sex work.  Okay I think I understand what  they’re trying to do.  This is supposed to be like sexy business woman  Barbie, right?  Chic urban New Yorker Barbie?  This looks like Up to her  Ears in Student Loans Dating a Man 25 Years Her Senior and Takes 5mg  Xanax Bars to Zone Out Enough to Get Through Obligation Sex Barbie.   That shit is dark.  I sent this picture last night to a trusted  colleague and he responded that he couldn’t get into this with me right  now because he totally wants to fuck that doll.  Exactly.

Read the rest.

I enjoyed the rest of the blog post, but to the best of my recollection, Barbie has always been a pretty sexy dresser - and the outfits above are just dresses.  They are even  relatively tasteful and modest dresses, especially by Barbie standards.  You can superimpose any degradation story you want on any version of Barbie, and use her outfits to tell the story.
Just for the sake of argument here - really - perhaps its a good thing if a Barbie in a dress that actually covers her body looks fuckable.  Maybe there’s a lesson that you don’t have to dress like a half naked slut to be desireable.
Anyway - I know, I know, Barbie is no roll model and I don’t know what to do with her either.

monkeytonenews:

generic1:

Squid pro quo:

Final section: sex work.  Okay I think I understand what they’re trying to do.  This is supposed to be like sexy business woman Barbie, right?  Chic urban New Yorker Barbie?  This looks like Up to her Ears in Student Loans Dating a Man 25 Years Her Senior and Takes 5mg Xanax Bars to Zone Out Enough to Get Through Obligation Sex Barbie.  That shit is dark.  I sent this picture last night to a trusted colleague and he responded that he couldn’t get into this with me right now because he totally wants to fuck that doll.  Exactly.

Read the rest.

I enjoyed the rest of the blog post, but to the best of my recollection, Barbie has always been a pretty sexy dresser - and the outfits above are just dresses.  They are even  relatively tasteful and modest dresses, especially by Barbie standards.  You can superimpose any degradation story you want on any version of Barbie, and use her outfits to tell the story.

Just for the sake of argument here - really - perhaps its a good thing if a Barbie in a dress that actually covers her body looks fuckable.  Maybe there’s a lesson that you don’t have to dress like a half naked slut to be desireable.

Anyway - I know, I know, Barbie is no roll model and I don’t know what to do with her either.

(via monkeytonenews)

November 22, 2010
mimiv:

generic1:

ABC RAIDS TOURIST BAR
Associated PressSan Francisco, CAMonday, November 22, 2010After a 2 a.m. sting operation, the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has closed the Buena Vista Cafe pending further investigation. A favorite drinking spot for tourists on  San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, the Buena Vista is accused by ABC  officials of marketing its signature cocktail, the Irish Coffee, to minors.“It’s combines caffeine with alcohol,” said an ABC spokesman. “In  light of the impending FDA ban on Four Loko, we must push for equal  enforcement. No one is above the law.”“Honestly, we’re shocked.”  said proprietor Seamus Finn, “We’ve been making this mixture of coffee,  whiskey, sugar and cream for over half a century now. There’s never  been a problem. I mean, there was that time Herb Caen exposed himself,  but that was over 20 years ago.”City Attorney Dennis Herrera disagreed. “The Irish Coffee is the Joe  Camel of alcoholic beverages. We should close them for blending liquor  and coffee alone. But the sugar and whipped cream clearly indicates  they’re marketing this cocktail to minors.”The FDA ban “should be the nail in the coffin of these dangerous and  toxic drinks,” said Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-New York) who has pushed the  Obama administration to ban the beverages. Schumer’s office put forward a  recent study which showed drinkers who combine alcohol and caffeine are  more likely to be injured, sexually assaulted, drive while drinking and  require medical attention than those who drink caffeine-free drinks.“Who will think of the children?” asked Lt. Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom.Not  all San Francisco’s elected officials are cheering the move. State  Senator Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) said, “This is insane.” When pressed  for further comment he said, “I thought this was San Francisco. When  did we turn into Vacaville?”Prominent local photographer Brizz struck a warier note. “First, they came for the Four Loko. And I did not speak up. Because I was not a Four Loko-er.”Residents of the lower Haight were less forgiving. “I didn’t speak  up because Four Loko tastes like ass,” said a local gutterpunk. “At  least Sparks had faint notes of wheat — not unlike a lager,” he added. “What the  fuck’s an Irish Coffee, again? Is that like Bailey’s or something?”The Federal Trade Commission, which regulates the marketing of the drinks, declined to comment.


Hilare.

mimiv:

generic1:

ABC RAIDS TOURIST BAR

Associated Press
San Francisco, CA
Monday, November 22, 2010


After a 2 a.m. sting operation, the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has closed the Buena Vista Cafe pending further investigation. A favorite drinking spot for tourists on San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, the Buena Vista is accused by ABC officials of marketing its signature cocktail, the Irish Coffee, to minors.

“It’s combines caffeine with alcohol,” said an ABC spokesman. “In light of the impending FDA ban on Four Loko, we must push for equal enforcement. No one is above the law.”

“Honestly, we’re shocked.” said proprietor Seamus Finn, “We’ve been making this mixture of coffee, whiskey, sugar and cream for over half a century now. There’s never been a problem. I mean, there was that time Herb Caen exposed himself, but that was over 20 years ago.”

City Attorney Dennis Herrera disagreed. “The Irish Coffee is the Joe Camel of alcoholic beverages. We should close them for blending liquor and coffee alone. But the sugar and whipped cream clearly indicates they’re marketing this cocktail to minors.”

The FDA ban “should be the nail in the coffin of these dangerous and toxic drinks,” said Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-New York) who has pushed the Obama administration to ban the beverages.

Schumer’s office put forward a recent study which showed drinkers who combine alcohol and caffeine are more likely to be injured, sexually assaulted, drive while drinking and require medical attention than those who drink caffeine-free drinks.

“Who will think of the children?” asked Lt. Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom.

Not all San Francisco’s elected officials are cheering the move. State Senator Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) said, “This is insane.” When pressed for further comment he said, “I thought this was San Francisco. When did we turn into Vacaville?”

Prominent local photographer Brizz struck a warier note. “First, they came for the Four Loko. And I did not speak up. Because I was not a Four Loko-er.”

Residents of the lower Haight were less forgiving. “I didn’t speak up because Four Loko tastes like ass,” said a local gutterpunk. “At least Sparks had faint notes of wheat — not unlike a lager,” he added. “What the fuck’s an Irish Coffee, again? Is that like Bailey’s or something?”

The Federal Trade Commission, which regulates the marketing of the drinks, declined to comment.

Hilare.

November 22, 2010
joyengel:

Um, yeah, whatever. There are things this cute in my life. SHUT UP.

joyengel:

Um, yeah, whatever. There are things this cute in my life. SHUT UP.

November 22, 2010
atoxique:

redguard:

Hip Hop contra el Machismo, Bronx, NY
So good.

YES
These men are so fucking WIN

atoxique:

redguard:

Hip Hop contra el Machismo, Bronx, NY

So good.

YES

These men are so fucking WIN

(via poisonous-blue)

August 19, 2010
generic1:

I have this well-meaning friend who keeps sending me my ex’s tweets in an effort to get me to realize that she was horrible person. It works more often than it doesn’t.
This was a comment on her new guy.
What kind of person would say such a thing of their lover on the Internet? Who would date such a person?
Oh. Wait.

bitch with a capital c.

generic1:

I have this well-meaning friend who keeps sending me my ex’s tweets in an effort to get me to realize that she was horrible person. It works more often than it doesn’t.

This was a comment on her new guy.

What kind of person would say such a thing of their lover on the Internet? Who would date such a person?

Oh. Wait.

bitch with a capital c.

August 12, 2010

yellowfeversf:

searchingforsuperpowers replied to your photo: Direct quote: “Why’s it so fucking hard to pay my…

is this for real just a random guy on a bus? did you just snap a photo of him with your phone? what is a bus monkey and are there a lot of them in San Francisco? I have yet to use the bus much…

yes. this is for real a random guy on the bus.

yes. i did snap a photo of him with my phone without him noticing because i am super-stealth. :)

a bus monkey is someone who takes up a ridiculous amount of room on the bus and basically dangles from the bars on the bus.  the bus monkeyness is not apparent in this picture as a seat had opened up.

August 12, 2010
thetenssf:

You take that shit back to Butte County, where it belongs.

thetenssf:

You take that shit back to Butte County, where it belongs.

August 12, 2010
"She should only stand next to very dim lighting in darkened clubs."

— Kevin Harris, on the ravages of age.

August 8, 2010
sexartandpolitics:

bonesarecoralmade:

toomucheyes:
From “PhotoBooth” by Rodell Warner
—
An inquiry into the new phenomenon driven by our intensifying ability to exchange and circulate self images has driven an inquiry into one’s ability to capture and present one’s image and present the self as one wants to be seen.
In the context of Trinidad & Tobago’s Erotic Art Week 2009 and 2010, Rodell pushed this inquiry into the realm of how people imaged themselves as erotic, and how willing they might be to share these images. He created “the Photobooth”; a small, temporary studio space that provided visitors with privacy and a remote control that triggered a stationary camera. With their signed permission, the images that participants captured of themselves were exhibited to the public the following night. “the Photobooth” will now become a touring installation work.

sexartandpolitics:

bonesarecoralmade:

toomucheyes:

From “PhotoBooth” by Rodell Warner

An inquiry into the new phenomenon driven by our intensifying ability to exchange and circulate self images has driven an inquiry into one’s ability to capture and present one’s image and present the self as one wants to be seen.

In the context of Trinidad & Tobago’s Erotic Art Week 2009 and 2010, Rodell pushed this inquiry into the realm of how people imaged themselves as erotic, and how willing they might be to share these images. He created “the Photobooth”; a small, temporary studio space that provided visitors with privacy and a remote control that triggered a stationary camera. With their signed permission, the images that participants captured of themselves were exhibited to the public the following night. “the Photobooth” will now become a touring installation work.

August 8, 2010
(via juliasegal)

(via juliasegal)

August 8, 2010
(via juliasegal)

(via juliasegal)

August 6, 2010
A funny thing happened in Twitter land the other day…

cristiangonzales:

I used to work at a huge PR firm. This was before I decided to try and venture into videography. I got fired due to me not “living up to their expectations”. I found that statement by their vice-president (who was a total bitch, excuse my French) to be rather ironic considering I was coming up with ideas that ended up landing accounts (among other things), but that’s neither here nor there at this point. Anyway, one of their main strategies to bring in new business were their pitches to new clients involving how to understand and utilize social media and social networking.

Personally, I felt half the time what they were pitching to these clients was bullshit. It was just a pretty and colorful way of telling them “be smart about social media, use it to you advantage, understand it before you utilize it, but don’t set your expectations too high.” Simple as that. Client after client fell for the pitch, which honestly, any media savvy person, or kid in college could’ve told them over a nice lunch. But apparently businesses like to be told stuff like this in colorful Powerpoint presentations or else they won’t believe it, and like to spend thousands of dollars on it, or else it doesn’t make sense to them. 

After I got fired, I came to realize that as much importance as the PR-firm-that-shall-not-be-named put on social media and networking (along with most of the media world), at the end of the day, it’s overrated. Sure, it provides new ways and different ways of marketing and connecting with the consumer, but it’s not some revolution or phenomenon that is worth spending a gazillion dollars on to understand. And really…can it make that much of a change at the end of the day? Well, I thought not…until Debra Walker (twitter.com/VoteDebraWalker) followed me yesterday on Twitter.

Earlier that day I’d posted a picture about the Tenderloin district in San Francisco (an area I happen to live in), and it looks like she found my Twitter handle in her search for people talking about her district, and decided to follow me. I’m a pretty active voter, including taking part in mid-year elections, but Debra wouldn’t have had a clue about that. The fact that she used social media and networking to find someone who she thought could possibly be an active voter impressed me beyond belief, and made me reconsider just how important social media is in the world today. After all, I didn’t know much about Debra until she decided to follow me on Twitter. And now, hell, she may just get my vote.

So, what’s the point of this long and drawn out story? Well, I still feel social media and networking is highly overrated in the world of today, where the media tends to exaggerate the importance and influence of practically everything. However, as Debra Walker pointed out to me yesterday, it can be an incredibly powerful tool when used just right and can leave an impact on the media savvy little guy (such as myself) that is incredibly unique and advantageous.

May 26, 2010
piscesinpurple:

generic1:

ohheygreat:

Jay Parkinson MD and I had an exchange in the comment section on this post that I’d like to elevate to the blog proper. I had taken umbrage with his initial post. We had a conversation. Jay’s final comment is shown in the image above. 
“I don’t always believe everything I write.”
Jay is looked to as an expert in both medicine and public health. He has an MD after his name, a sizable following on the internet, a steady stream of publicity, regular gigs speaking at events. He’s also a co-founder of a company that creates new healthcare solutions.
I find it deeply disturbing he would make damaging and potentially dangerous statements and then dismiss them as something he does not believe in. 
There is an enormous gulf between writing with nuance and making an inflammatory, sweeping generalization like “anti-depressants are the modern snake oil” simply to “get people to think.” Especially when you fail to follow up with any nuance or by guiding people to help them understand. Posting an excerpt from a Newsweek article that further emphasizes your point - an article that itself was nuanced - is not the same thing.
You can write what you believe in without using fine detail and get people to listen to you. Hell, you can even write bullshit you don’t believe in - as long as it’s not damaging and dangerous, and as long as you aren’t an expert meant to help and guide people. 
As a doctor, your primary concern should be caring for patients and doing what is best for them - not getting people’s attention by any means necessary, not busting up “Big Pharma,” not letting the bias come through from some consumer protection organization you worked for. People are fed up enough with the health care system, with people lying to them, with being unable to figure out how to navigate the system, with having the truth hidden from them behind smoke screens from one side or the other. If you want to build a system that works, if you really want to help people, if you want them to be well, then start by speaking the truth. 

piscesinpurple:

generic1:

ohheygreat:

Jay Parkinson MD and I had an exchange in the comment section on this post that I’d like to elevate to the blog proper. I had taken umbrage with his initial post. We had a conversation. Jay’s final comment is shown in the image above. 

“I don’t always believe everything I write.”

Jay is looked to as an expert in both medicine and public health. He has an MD after his name, a sizable following on the internet, a steady stream of publicity, regular gigs speaking at events. He’s also a co-founder of a company that creates new healthcare solutions.

I find it deeply disturbing he would make damaging and potentially dangerous statements and then dismiss them as something he does not believe in. 

There is an enormous gulf between writing with nuance and making an inflammatory, sweeping generalization like “anti-depressants are the modern snake oil” simply to “get people to think.” Especially when you fail to follow up with any nuance or by guiding people to help them understand. Posting an excerpt from a Newsweek article that further emphasizes your point - an article that itself was nuanced - is not the same thing.

You can write what you believe in without using fine detail and get people to listen to you. Hell, you can even write bullshit you don’t believe in - as long as it’s not damaging and dangerous, and as long as you aren’t an expert meant to help and guide people. 

As a doctor, your primary concern should be caring for patients and doing what is best for them - not getting people’s attention by any means necessary, not busting up “Big Pharma,” not letting the bias come through from some consumer protection organization you worked for. People are fed up enough with the health care system, with people lying to them, with being unable to figure out how to navigate the system, with having the truth hidden from them behind smoke screens from one side or the other. If you want to build a system that works, if you really want to help people, if you want them to be well, then start by speaking the truth. 

May 23, 2010
zachfey:

thankyouforreading:

peetypassion:

Bruno Catalano - In Search of Missing Pieces 
‘In Search of Missing Pieces’ is a series of original sculptures by  French artist Bruno Catalono.

zachfey:

thankyouforreading:

peetypassion:

Bruno Catalano - In Search of Missing Pieces

‘In Search of Missing Pieces’ is a series of original sculptures by French artist Bruno Catalono.

May 20, 2010
mitochondrion:

generic1:

vegansaurus:

As a vegan, there are few things more nails-on-chalkboard grating than hearing yet another word or phrase invented by green-minded omnivores to feel better about themselves for eating meat. If you call yourself a “pescatarian” or “flexitarian,” unless you can point me to the pesctable and flexifruit aisles of the produce section (and no, Monsanto gene-splicing doesn’t count), you’re really just a meat-eater appropriating vegetarianism to latch onto some kind of perceived moral credibility.

It’s not perceived moral credibility, it’s moral credibility, full stop. Vegetarianism can have a spectrum of motives. They can be political or ethical or just plain health concerns. You don’t get a veto over my choices just because the north of your moral compass doesn’t align with mine. 
As one ex-Vice President is fond of saying, global warming is a moral issue. My locally farmed rainbow trout is a world away from the CO2 debt of a steak and you damn well know it. Less Angus t-bone. Moral credibility.
The First Lady tells me there’s an obesity problem and that we owe it to ourselves and our children to eat right. Fewer cheeseburgers. Moral credibility. 
You want to reduce the debate to animal rights? Fine. I think they’re food and you don’t. Agree to disagree. But your criteria don’t invalidate mine. And if you’re going to throw elbows, please take care to spell “pescetarian” correctly.

mitochondrion:

generic1:

vegansaurus:

As a vegan, there are few things more nails-on-chalkboard grating than hearing yet another word or phrase invented by green-minded omnivores to feel better about themselves for eating meat. If you call yourself a “pescatarian” or “flexitarian,” unless you can point me to the pesctable and flexifruit aisles of the produce section (and no, Monsanto gene-splicing doesn’t count), you’re really just a meat-eater appropriating vegetarianism to latch onto some kind of perceived moral credibility.

It’s not perceived moral credibility, it’s moral credibility, full stop. Vegetarianism can have a spectrum of motives. They can be political or ethical or just plain health concerns. You don’t get a veto over my choices just because the north of your moral compass doesn’t align with mine. 

As one ex-Vice President is fond of saying, global warming is a moral issue. My locally farmed rainbow trout is a world away from the CO2 debt of a steak and you damn well know it. Less Angus t-bone. Moral credibility.

The First Lady tells me there’s an obesity problem and that we owe it to ourselves and our children to eat right. Fewer cheeseburgers. Moral credibility. 

You want to reduce the debate to animal rights? Fine. I think they’re food and you don’t. Agree to disagree. But your criteria don’t invalidate mine. And if you’re going to throw elbows, please take care to spell “pescetarian” correctly.

11:00pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zv3EYyarPln
  
Filed under: vegetarian